Tag: Colorado History

Best Historical Site in Colorado To Bring the Kids to Before & During The School Year

est Historical Sites in Colorado For Kids

School is back in action, but a little unconventional this year. 

Some schools have already started, some are conducting a hybrid program, and many are following an online distance learning curriculum.

Whatever your child’s school year looks like a field trip can be the best way to encourage normalcy and provide a fun and encouraging way to help children learn.

In fact, the National Education Association finds that children who regularly attend educational field trips have better grades by 59%! 

Are you looking for a great field trip for your child(ren)?

One of the best historical sites in Colorado to bring the kids to before & during the school year is the Royal Gorge Bridge and Park!

Here are 3 highlights why The Royal Gorge Bridge and Park is one of the most fascinating field trips in Colorado.  Kids of all ages will learn fun historical facts when they visit the Royal Gorge Bridge and Park in Colorado.

1. The Area Around The Royal Gorge Bridge Was Originally Occupied With Dinosaurs, Native American Tribes & More

Before the construction of the Royal Gorge Bridge & Park, the area around the bridge acted as a historical site in Colorado in and of itself. 

In fact, geologists from the National Park Service say the Gorge was created by pebbles and rocks constantly grinding against each other during the“pre-Cambrian age —” a period 541 million years ago.

If geologists are correct, this would mean the gorge the Royal Gorge Bridge straddles above and the rock walls surrounding the Arkansas River originally was home to many dinosaurs, Native American Tribes, American Explorers, and other historical events long before the construction of the Royal Gorge Bridge and Park. 

Other historians understand the Gorge acted as a centralized location for the Ute Native American tribe before the construction of the Royal Gorge Bridge & Park. The Native American Tribes used the area for protection from intruders and warmth in the winter months.

Overall, the Cañon City, Colorado, the area is home to many dinosaur fossils. In fact, on your way home from visiting the Royal Gorge Bridge and Park we recommend taking the historical Skyline Drive to see actual dinosaur footprints.

2. The Royal Gorge Bridge & Park, 91 years later, survive the Great Depression, and the Royal Gorge Fire

In 1929 a gentleman by the name of Lon Piper decided he would enhance the spectacular scenery of the Royal Gorge in Colorado by constructing a magnificent suspension bridge that would reach from one side of the gorge to the other. With the help of an engineer, George Cole, the bridge came to life.

At the cost of $350,000 the bridge was constructed in 7 months and remains an engineering marvel today according to the ASE (American Society of Engineers).. 

 the bridge was constructed between June and November of 1929 and provided work for about 80 men, right before The Great Depression hit full force in America 

Shortly after The Great Depression, the bridge experienced the economical hit from World War II. Although it wasn’t directly affected by the same destruction on the battlefield, there were a lot of economical hardships associated with that timeframe. 

Fast forward to the twenty-first century, and the Royal Gorge Fire of June 11, 2013.  The Royal Gorge Bridge experienced a brutal man-made fire that burned four days and destroyed 90% of the park.  The bridge survived with only  100 out of the 1,292 wooden deck planks burned. During this time period, the Royal Gorge Bridge and Park shut down for a  historic rebuild and opened up 14 months later over Labor Day weekend of 2014.   

3. The Royal Gorge Bridge & Park is the Highest  Suspension Bridge in America

Visitors of all ages come to experience the Royal Gorge Bridge and Park and actively engage with history. 

In fact, the Royal Gorge Bridge and Park in Colorado is still considered the highest suspension bridge in America, and until 17 years ago it was the highest suspension bridge in the world.

Many constructions from the early 20th century have come and gone, but the Royal Gorge Bridge still has many of its original features from 1929, and when you come to visit  you will fully experience the magic that was created 91 years ago.

Learn More About The Royal Gorge Bridge As An Amazing Historical Site in ColoradoBest Historical Sites in Colorado For Kids

Not only will you and your child(ren) be able to experience first hand this historical site in Colorado, but you will be able to watch a regularly scheduled 20 minute historical documentary in the Plaza Theater available with a general admissions ticket — here you will also see Royal Gorge Bridge and Park history unfold through the historical photo displays.   

Are you and your child(ren) ready to visit one of the best historical sites in Colorado? 

Book your tickets now, and beat the lines!

 

Source: Pamela’s Instagram

Fremont County’s Deep History

Millions of years after dinosaurs roamed the land that is now known as Canon City and Fremont County, Lt. Zebulon Pike explored frigid Arkansas River region in the winter of 1806. John C. Fremont, famed pathfinder and once presidential candidate, arrived to the area in 1843 and returned for multiple expeditions finding the headwaters of the Arkansas River and finding the railroad route through the Royal Gorge, still available today.

One of 17 original Colorado counties, it was home to the first-drilled oil well west of the Mississippi. Today, travelers can experience many of the same staples that helped form the country and surrounding towns. From the natural beauty of the Royal Gorge, to the rushing white waters of the Arkansas River.

Popular hiking and biking trails include the Oil Well Flats, most well-known for the discovery of intricate dinosaur bones. One of the region’s newest trail systems, it is constantly being modified and updated. Shelf Road is also a choice spot for climbers and hikers. Agriculture is also very popular here with orchards, farms and fisheries.

Odes to Fremont can be found all over, whether wandering the stacks of books inside the John C. Fremont Library, or catching a glimpse of his 20-foot statue at the entrance of Pathfinder Park. Come discover the beauty and adventure  that can be found in Fremont County.